Indonesia

Kerinci Gunung Tujuh Sumatra Anaerobic Natural

The producer cooperative responsible for this Anaerobic Natural lot are trying to add to the country’s rich tradition by diversifying the coop's processing methods. This innovative lot applies anaerobic natural processing for a boozy, fruity cup profile. 

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Details

Coffee Grade:
Kerinci Gr. 1
Farm/Coop/Station:
Koerintji Barokah Bersama
Varietal:
Andung Sari, Sigarar Utang
Processing:
Anaerobic Natural
Altitude:
1,400 to 1,700 meters above sea level
Owner:
320 members of Koerintji Barokah Bersama Cooperative
Subregion/Town:
Gunung Tujuh
Region:
Kerinci, Sumatra
Farm Size:
<2.5 hectares on average
Bag Size:
30kg GrainPro
Harvest Months:
Sumatra: April-June (main crop) & Nov-Jan; year-round (fly crop)| Java: April - August | Bali: April - July | Flores: May - September | Sulawesi: May - October | Papua: May - October

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About This Coffee

The 320 members of the Koerintji Barokah Bersama Cooperative live and farm on a plateau that sits at the foot of Mount Kerinci on the island of Sumatra. Mount Kerinci is one of the many volcanoes in the Pacific Ring of Fire, a 40,000-kilometer horseshoe-shaped series of 452 volcanoes that are part of an almost constant dance of eruptions and plate movements. Mount Kerinci’s historic eruptions have assured that the surrounding area is lush and verdant thanks to the deep supply of fertile volcanic soil.

The cooperative is managed by Triyono, who leads members in processing and roasting their own coffee. They have a fully outfitted roasting facility, including a cupping lab, next to the dry mill. This is especially impressive considering the cooperative was founded in mid-2017!

Cultivation

Almost all farms on Sumatra are small. On average, farms are between 0.5 to 2.5 hectares. Coffee is usually the primary cash crop for farmers, but most also intercrop their trees alongside vegetables, potatoes and fruit. This intercropped produce will make up a substantial part of the family’s diet for the year. 

In addition to growing coffee as a cash crop, many smallholder farmers also work as hired laborers at the nearby tea plantations. Tea is also a huge crop in the area. The bigger tea plantations are often near coffee farms. When the coffee harvest is finished, coffee farmers will go there and pick tea leaves under contracted labor. 

There are more and more initiatives by farmers on Sumatra to organize themselves into cooperatives. In the past, farmers did not have much leverage to help themselves get better prices for their cherry or parchment. When they’re in cooperatives, they can share resources, organize training and negotiate better prices.

Harvest & Post-Harvest

During the harvest season, coffee is handpicked, with labor usually supplied by the immediate family. After picking, the coffee will be delivered to a UPH collection center.

Triyono oversees the activities on and around nine UPH stations owned by the cooperative.  A UPH is a collection center where coffee cherries are bought by the coop and where the coffee is processed before moving it to the central mill. Essentially, a UPH functions as a small washing station. 

To streamline the operation, there is an agriculturalist providing technical assistance to make sure the standard operation procedures are applied while processing at the different stations. Each UPH is located in a different area and receives cherries from different farmer groups.

With this Anaerobic Natural lot, coffee is first floated and separated by density before being laid on raised beds where workers remove underripes, overripes and damaged cherry. Then, ripe cherry is collected again and sealed in airtight, 20kg plastic bags that are stored in a cool, dry location (with temperatures between 18 and 22 degrees Celsius) for 7 days.

After 7 days, cherry is again laid on raised beds to dry. The beds are located in domes that protect the coffee from rain or harsh sunlight. The parchment will dry here for around 20 to 23 days. When dry, the coffee is milled and sorted by hand.

Farmers receive fair prices for their cherry and have a fixed buyer for their cherries. The coop's profit at the end of the year is either invested in infrastructure to improve quality or is shared with the producers. Farmers also receive technical support and seedlings for shade trees for on and around the farm. 

Buy 1 Get 1 Tree

Sucafina Specialty is partnering with Rikolto and the Koerintji Barokah Bersama cooperative to donate shade trees in Indonesia! Every bag of Kerinci Gunung Tujuh Sumatra coffee that you purchase will generate a donation of 1 avocado tree to Barokah member farmers.

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Sucafina in Indonesia

Sucafina has established offices and quality labs in Indonesia that are staffed by an experienced team who manage our activities across this vast and diverse island nation. We partner with farmers, cooperatives, collectors, mills, and exporters from many producing islands including Sulawesi, Flores, Bali, Java and Sumatra. We work to identify the best producers across Indonesia and support their ability to improve quality, increase capacity and access the market.

We regularly travel to visit partner producers. Visits are essential to maintaining and strengthening the relationships that are integral to our communal success. Visits help us gather accurate, up to date information on harvest and post-harvest timing and practices. We also use this time with producers to help identify challenges they are facing and determine where we can help them work towards sustainable, affordable solutions. Our local team oversees logistics to ensure that coffee moves safely and efficiently from farm to mill to port, and on to you. With comprehensive quality control at multiple stages of the supply chain, we ensure the integrity of each shipment and work continuously on quality improvement.

Indonesia has an impressive diversity of coffees to offer and the industry continues to evolve and change. Whether you’re looking for consistent deliveries of the classic wet-hulled profile from North Sumatra or Aceh, the clean washed coffees from Flores or Sulawesi, or experimental micro-lots from the new generation of producers emerging around the archipelago, the team at Sucafina Indonesia is ready to help.

Coffee in Indonesia

Indonesia has a long coffee producing history, but recently their coffees have been overlooked by the specialty market. Thanks to our innovative and ever-expanding supply chain, we are proud to bring you high-quality coffees from many of Indonesia’s unique regions, accompanied by in-depth traceability information.

Indonesia is perhaps best known for its unique wet hulling process (giling basah). Though its exact origins are unclear, wet hulling most likely originated in Aceh during the late 1970s.

Wet hulling’s popularity can be attributed to producers’ need for prompt payments. It was also adopted specifically by many producers who lacked the drying infrastructure that was needed to shelter drying parchment from the high humidity and inconsistent rainfall typical in Sumatra. At higher elevations with constant humidity and unpredictable rainfall, drying can prove to be slow, risky and difficult.

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